Category: Big Irish Thoughts

Overconfident and even shameless in my public persona, I assure you I am never unaware of how fortunate I am. I spend every day doing things that countless fellow gamers would dearly love to pursue, and I am permitted to call this my vocation (and my avocation).

Today is one of those days when my cup overfloweth – not so much because of something I did specifically, but because of my good fortune to have collaborated with an all-star cast on something of great value and importance. Michael Surbrook did all the heavy lifting. Ross Watson oversaw the structure and the execution. Jason Waters took the necessary risks and made the project possible.

Today, we at Evil Beagle Games (along with High Rock Press) are celebrating Aaron Allston’s Strike Force, both for the reception of the BAMFSIES Gamers’ Choice Award and for the exceptionally grand review it received on EN World.

To have been a part of something like this is an honor, marking an important and cherished moment in my career. Thanks to everyone who supported it, and everyone who rightfully remembers Aaron’s work for the treasure that it is.

A superhero setting like no other. A role-playing game campaign book that includes techniques and lessons from over 22 years of play. A tribute to one of the greatest creators in the RPG industry, created using Champions 6th Edition.

In 1988, Aaron Allston released Strike Force, a supplement detailing the first eight years of his superhero campaign. Noted for its extensive and highly-influential advice to gamemasters on how to run a long-term campaign, Strike Force was a landmark RPG publication.

We have now released an updated version of this classic book for the 21st Century. Aaron himself was designing this new edition of Strike Force before his untimely death, and we wanted to bring his work to life as a monument to Aaron’s lasting influence on the RPG hobby. This  updated Strike Force sourcebook includes never-before-seen material detailing Aaron’s multiversal superhero setting, compelling characters and villains, and updated and expanded advice from Superhero RPG veterans like Steve Kenson and Sean Patrick Fannon for how to run a campaign using “the Strike Force method.”

The electronic portion of this product includes character write-ups for Mutants & Masterminds and ICONS.

Sean Patrick Fannon
Writer & Game Designer: Shaintar, Star Wars, Savage Rifts, much more
Please check out my Patreon and get involved directly with my next projects!

This game is very popular for many reasons. It speaks to folks in a lot of ways.

Today, it speaks to me.

“We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far.” —H.P. Lovecraft

Will you stand against the horrors of the night?

Whether learned professor, nosy journalist, or hard-hitting detective, investigators need all the help they can get. Let this book be your guide. The Investigator Handbook is an essential player’s aid for the Call of Cthulhu 7th edition roleplaying game

Written for those who will be playing the roles of investigators, the Investigator Handbook contains expanded rules for creating players characters, a wealth of over 100 occupations and skill descriptions, as well as guidance on getting the most from the game. What’s more, there’s a range of organizations for your investigator to belong to, detailed information about the classic 1920s setting, equipment and weapons for both the 1920s and modern day, and expert tips and advice for all budding investigators.

No self-respecting investigator of the Cthulhu Mythos should be without it!

Sean Patrick Fannon
Writer & Game Designer: Shaintar, Star Wars, Savage Rifts, much more
Please check out my Patreon and get involved directly with my next projects!

Hey, everyone!

I’m in Atlanta today, and will be up on Signal Mountain come Friday. I am visiting dear family and friends for the first time in a while, so Sean’s Pick of the Day is taking a week’s vacation while I enjoy this time away.

I do want to wish everyone Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Blessed Solstice, and Fantastic Holidays! See you all again in the New Year!

This morning, I’d like to bring your attention to blog entries of note.

The first one is written by my friend and colleague, Steve Kenson, who understands the issue discussed in his latest blog post better than most of us. He gets into the difference between establishing equality in your game or setting and actually promoting inclusivity. An important and worthy read.

As well (and far less important, but hopefully fun and interesting, nonetheless), I’ve launched a new regular article over at the Stuffer Shack. It’s called Life of a Big Irish Gamer, and it’s pretty much what the title sells it to be. If you’d like to know more about the stuff I watch, do, and experience as a part of being a professional game writer, publisher, and GM, check it out and let me know what you think.

Happy reading, and have a great weekend!

~ Big Irish

I’m a Kickstarter Pledge Level again, this time running an exclusive premiere game event at Chupacabracon, May 12-14, 2017. If you’ve been trying to figure out which gaming convention to attend, look no further – me and many of my colleagues cannot recommend Chupa highly enough. They bring together an incredible all-star cast of writers, designers, artists, and publishers, and they set up a space and a schedule the likes of which every other game con can learn from. They’re exceptional people running an exceptional event, and I am proud to be going back yet again.

Even more proud to be a “pledge level” for them, and I can promise something new, fun, and exciting for those who pledge the Savage VIP Level (as of this writing, there are only three slots left)!

It is, simply, the biggest Big Epic Game I’ve ever attempted – and I am a person known for doing huge gaming events. I’ve gathered dozens of folks together in a single room before, and surprised everyone with how it can work so that everyone feels engaged throughout. I’ve had co-GMs, big round-robin narrative+die roll things, etc.. I’ve developed lots of interesting techniques to pull off the Big Epic Game.

This time, however, I may have folks wondering about my sanity more than usual. It’s worth it, though, because this one is for charity.

The Final Crusade: The Battle of Camondel marks my return to Shaintar, the epic high fantasy setting I’ve created over nearly 40 years, published by Savage Mojo for Savage Worlds. Not only will I have up to two dozen players on site with me (including Hero Games alumnus Ray Greer and Evil Beagle’s own Ross Watson and Carinn Seabolt) at the Nighthawk Brewery on October 9th, playing out a massive battle against the forces of the Prelacy (and some powerful stuff from beyond the Veil), anyone in the world can participate in this game, either before the day or in real-time, the day of the event.

The details of how to participate are explained at the main link, but the short of it is this:

  • Make a Donation via the charity link.
  • In the comments section of the donation, indicate the benefit you wish to give one of the on-site PCs. There’s a list for specific donation levels. There’s also a list of PCs at the main link (The Dramatis Personae), or you can just indicate the benefit goes to the current battle commander.
  • Narrate what your own PC or group is doing as part of the battle to incur that benefit for the others.
  • You can also join in via the YouTube stream, live and in real-time, to further comment, narrate, and have your actions included in on-site battle reports.

Depending on how many of you choose to participate, this could be one of the biggest “tabletop” RPG events ever. I’d be interested in trying to make it so, because cancer has taken entirely too many awesome folks out of the world, making this an epic and worthy fight both in the game, and especially out of it.

I sincerely hope you’ll join us, and I’d appreciate your help in spreading the word and getting folks involved.

Sincerely,

Big Irish AKA Sean Patrick Fannon

Hey, folks! Like I said, I want to start using this thing for more than just the usual Picks. My roommate and Evil Beagle Games partner, Ross Watson and I talk RPG setting world building with Christopher “Savage Bull” Landauer for this latest episode. It was a great discussion. There’s a bunch more they talk about, all related to gaming in general and Pinnacle/Savage Worlds in particular.

Ross Watson of Accursed fame and Shaintar’s Sean Patrick Fannon join us for the first of our World Builders interviews. We’ve been talking about our World Builder interviews since the start of the show so we’re excited to bring you the first in what we hope is a long series delving into the thought process behind bringing you many and varied settings to play in.

SBN Podcast says goodbye after 41 episodes

Fear the Boot celebrates 10 years and over 400 episodes

Savage Bull is now helping with the setting Savage Mommy is currently working on. More info later.

Hit the link for more information and to listen to the podcast.

 

Now that I am getting past the insanity of the Savage Rifts Kickstarter (though there’s still plenty of work ahead), I plan to get back to using this space for more sharing of thoughts and ideas and generally neat geekery.

Today, I’d like to share this really charming cartoon/article from the Washington Post by Josh Kramer, exploring the concept that lots of folks are either returning to the RPG table, or are deciding to join us all for the first time in their adulthood. I sincerely believe there are more of us than there’s ever been, and I love seeing articles like this.

As I am fond of saying every time we recognize one of the Tribe while out-and-about (I have an instinct for it, though admittedly, various kinds of T-shirts and other paraphernalia usually give it away, either on my end or theirs), “We are everywhere, and we are legion.”

Hit the image or the link above to see the whole thing.

The following linked article is making the rounds on my social network, posted and re-posted primarily by women who love and support and do fantastic things in this hobby and industry that I love. They are hurt, sickened, and angry, and they have every right to be. So, too, anyone who faces discrimination, bullying, and ostracization from those who feel that gaming somehow belongs only to them.

Fair warning – there’s some very dark and disturbing things revealed in this article. The author shares some terrible things done to her, and to others.

It’s important that we acknowledge and deal with this. We are supposed to be better than this. We must become better than this.

Tabletop Gaming has a White Male Terrorism Problem

One more thing – if you disagree, fine, do so openly and with a focus on discussion and debate. If you’re the kind of piece of work that makes death threats and anonymous trolling posts because “Hurrrr, hurrr, you cain’t take mah hobbee frum me,” just do us all a favor and find a hole to fall very far down. There are plenty of troglodytes to share the depths with you down there.

I’ve not really been doing much blogging with this thing, but that changes today. A discussion broke out on a page on Facebook that touches on something I am very passionate about, and I’ve decided my ultimate response on that page will be my first blog on here. I hope to do more as time permits and ideas flow.

Why Punish Your Friends?

Seriously, I want to challenge all of you who are in the “You don’t play, you get no XP” camp to consider these questions:
 
What is the real, tangible benefit of denying one of the players XP for missing a game?

What do you, the GM, gain from it?

What do your players gain from it?

What does the player who missed gain from it?

 
I am not talking about people who blow the game off for something else they’d rather do. I am not talking about players who don’t show and never bother to let you know and never really explain why. I am not talking about players who simply won’t commit to the campaign when everyone else has.
 
Those folks are rude and either need to be disinvited (if it really matters to you and your group) or, sure, dock them XPs. Negative reinforcement for negative behavior. I can live with that.
 
The people I am talking about have children who need them to talk to their teachers. They have parents with medical conditions that cause emergencies to crop up. They have jobs that demand overtime hours at the worst moments. They get sick from any number of things and don’t want to make their friends sick.
 
These are good people with lives that cause issues, and they are your friends and fellow gamers who want to be there – would have way more fun being there than whatever else it is they are dealing with – and it sucks that they had to miss while you and everyone else had a good time.
 
So what do you gain – seriously, what is the tangible or emotional GAIN – from letting their characters fall behind in XP and growth? If it’s a cooperative game where the abilities of all the characters contributes to the group’s dynamics and success, what is the reward for the GM and the other players that comes from punishing the one who had to miss?